Kingsley Hall

(1706) This elegant Queen Anne building was originally built as a private house, its brick frontage is carried on five pillars and extends over the pavement. In 1911 the building was extended at the back to include a meeting hall that was opened in 1911 by the labour leader Keir Hardie. The building was subsequently used by a range of political organisations. Now converted to offices.

Home to Trade Unions

A number of Trade Union organisations took up offices in Kingsley Hall or in premises nearby including the Amalgamated and Engineering Union; Amalgamated Society of Woodcutting Machinists; British Railwayman’s Club and Institute; National Society of Painters; National Union of General and Municipal Workers and the self- styled Trade Union Organizer Harry Webb.

Founding of St Philip’s Conservative Club

Founded by John Lysaght for the benefit of working men. The role of the Club is described as doing everything to “contribute to their social improvement.”

Kingsley Hall

Kingsley Hall was opened by Mr. and Mrs. Hardie forming an important meeting place for socialists. It was named after Charles Kinsley (1819 -1875), priest, historian and novelist. It became an important centre for left wing movement including bristols trade unions. It featured many important speakers including Tony Benn.

Hunger March Accomodations

During the 1930's depression, workers across the country staged a series of Hunger Marches.

New Shop Front

the parapet was added in the last century. the 19th century shop front has half-glazed doors and 6 windows on either side of the door, each window comprising of a plain lower window with 2 2 x 2 windows above

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